Monday, August 11, 2008

Is the CIA behind terror threats to Singapore?

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Lee Kuan Yew, prime minister of Singapore from 1959 to 1990

1. In the New York Times, 16 June 1991, Eric Kocher wrote:

"In postindependence Singapore, the C.I.A. had a mission other than the collection of intelligence, namely, to unseat Lee Kuan Yew, the new Prime Minister.

"In his early years, Mr. Lee was leftist" ( Usually Unnecessary, Often Undesirable, That's the C.I.A. - New ...)


2. Tim Weiner, in his book 'Legacy Of Ashes: The History Of The CIA' (Allen Lane, 2007), tells how, in 1961, CIA agents tried to bribe an important Singapore official. (Free)

Former Singapore Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew , in his book 'From Third World To First' (Times Editions, 2000), writes about the bribe attempt. ( Free)

Mr Lee ordered that a trap be laid.

As three CIA agents met their 'spy' in a flat in Orange Grove Road, the Singapore Special Branch arrived and arrested the Americans.

The CIA offered US $ 1 million to Lee's People's Action Party in the hope they would hush the matter up.

Singapore released one man, who had diplomatic immunity.

Two CIA officers were sent to jail but released after one month.

Kastari

3. On 27 February 2008, alleged terrorist Mas Selamat Kastari escaped from the Whitley Road Detention Centre, in Singapore.

The detention centre has armed guards, high wire fences and CCTV cameras. Singapore is a country where "security breaches are virtually unheard of",[18][19]

Kastari is the suspected Singapore leader of the Southeast Asian 'terrorist network' Jemaah Islamiyah.

Jemaah Islamiyah has been blamed for bombings that killed 202 people, mostly foreign tourists, on Indonesia's Bali island in 2002. (Singapore detention center officials sacked over terror leader's ... / A PERFECT HIDING PLACE)

Singapore authorities have alleged that Kastari planned to crash seven bomb-filled trucks at various locations around Singapore.[2]

In January 2006, Kastari was arrested by Indonesian anti-terror squads in Java and deported to Singapore.

He was suspected of plotting to bomb Singapore Changi Airport in 2002,[3] and, according to the Singapore Police Force, he had initially planned to do so by crashing a plane into the airport.[2]

However, Kastari has never been formally charged with any terrorism-related offences;[4] instead, he was detained under the country's Internal Security Act, which allows indefinite detention without trial.[5]



Omar al Faruq

4. Time magazine reported in 2002:

"On Sept. 9, (2002 ) according to a secret CIA summary of the interview, al-Faruq confessed that he was, in fact, al-Qaeda's senior representative in Southeast Asia... Al-Faruq said two senior al-Qaeda officials... had ordered him to "plan large-scale attacks against U.S. interests in ... Singapore..." ( Confessions of an al-Qaeda Terrorist - TIME )


4. Omar Al-Faruq was described as being the mastermind of the Bali bomb plot.

Al-Faruq was arrested in Bogor on June 5, 2002 and handed over to the US authorities.

Former Indonesian State Intelligence Coordinating Board (BAKIN) chief A.C. Manulang was quoted by Tempo as saying that Al-Faruq was most likely a CIA-recruited agent. Omar Al-Faruq Recruited by The CIA

A Pentagon official in Washington has confirmed that al-Faruq escaped from a U.S. detention facility in Bagram, Afghanistan, on 10 July 2005. (Pakistan News Service - PakTribune)

Al-Qaeda man's easy jail escape - World - smh.com.au





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