Thursday, February 07, 2008

Time to close down the big supermarkets


It's time to close down the big supermarkets because they do more harm than good.

Walmart and Tesco are examples of big supermarkets.

"Wal-Mart may drive prices down, but it drags the quality of life for millions of people down with it.

"With hundreds of employees dependent on public assistance to meet their basic needs, American taxpayers subsidize Wal-Mart's low prices at the rate of roughly $420,750 a year for every 200-employee store by paying for low-income services...

"Wal-Mart hurts U.S. communities by undercutting local merchants and increasing urban sprawl, and its suppliers have been cited for labor and human rights violations." - Responsible Shopper Profile: Wal-Mart:

"I've had a big notice in my shop window for a few weeks "the shop that Tesco cannot close" along with photos of the 50 empty shops in our town.

"There's a huge Tesco here, and the town centre is in a bad way.

"I think that small scale retail is just about dead ..." -clearwood.co.uk (Comment is free: Tesco the superweed)

Tesco is to open a third store in the town of Dumfries.

"Tesco would take about 60% of all money being spent in the town." Traders fear third Tesco's impact


"The trouble with weeds is that left unchecked they become invasive and strangle everything else. Tesco has spread uncontrolled with frightening speed. In some parts of the country it has 45% of the grocery market...

"Tesco... subverts the democratic process as it forces through planning permissions against community wishes; it added 2m sq ft of sales space last year alone...

"It suffocates independent shops and markets; it uses its power to squeeze its suppliers...

"The supermarket sector, with its just-in-time ordering that requires casual labour to be turned on and off like a tap, and its new packhouse industries, has been one of the most prolific creators of demand for trafficked labour."

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